Follow

I'm Lauren - a 22 year old beauty, fitness and porridge-loving #YoPro (young professional) from London.

What I read this month (a particularly eclectic selection!)

What I read this month (a particularly eclectic selection!)

I am an avid reader and like many of my fellow #yopros, a good book is integral to surviving #yopro life. From tucking into a page-turner at lunch to escaping to another world during my morning commute, my Kindle is my favourite day-to-day gadget. 

Here are my August reads:

The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd (4/5)

From the author of The HelpThe Invention of Wings follows the lifespan of two girls in nineteenth century Charleston (America). Their lives become entangled when Hetty, a slave, is given as a present to Sarah, the daughter of a wealthy lawyer, on her eleventh birthday. The novel is about the tragic struggle for freedom, functioning as an historical commentary on the relationship between feminism and slavery in nineteenth century America. Easy to read, hard to put down and a beautiful story based on real events. Give it a go!

The Passage, Justin Cronin (4/5)

I started this 1000 page beast on recommendation from my wonderful friend over at Mollipop.co.ukThe Passage is a vampire-thriller-meets-science-fiction-dystopian-post-apocalyptic-epic-movie-type novel that has so much crammed into it that it's hard to know where to begin! It all starts with a virus that is accidentally leaked by a secret US military division, which turns humans into - long story short - flesh-eating vampires. Civilisation collapses and the last of the humans (100 years later) struggle to save their race without modern technologies. Although this book took me three weeks of solid reading to get through, it was well worth it. The synopsis sounds cliched, but trust me, Cronin's novel is thoroughly imaginative and left me wanting more (even after 1000 pages!).  

If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things, Jon McGregor (2/5)

I was recommended this book for its profundity, style and depth of thought. McGregor's If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things is set on an ordinary street in northern England. Shrouded in realism, it cleverly tells the interlinking stories of characters living on the same street. I very much enjoyed this narrative technique and the ultimate message that we are all living at the same time. Unfortunately, I hated everything else. The novel was so boring that I struggled to finish it. Nothing really happens. 2/5!

The Five People You Meet In Heaven, Mitch Albom (5/5)

Mitch Albom’s New York Bestseller The Five People You Meet in Heaven is a book about death that will irrevocably change your life. In the end, which is only ever another beginning, 83-year-old war veteran Eddie meets five people in heaven who, in different ways, saved his life during his time on earth. In this brave, poetic and universal journey to the afterlife, Albom will convince you to make amends with those you love, because in the end, our actions connect us all. An absolute must-read.

 

If you have any recommendations, please let me know in the comments!

Why there's more to Prague than stag dos

Why there's more to Prague than stag dos

The volcano didn't erupt! Sorrento, Naples & Positano

The volcano didn't erupt! Sorrento, Naples & Positano